When yuh have cocoa in de sun, look out for rain!

Trinidadian phrase used as a warning that something is vulnerable, and needs to be protected; often used for situations in which people have something to hide.

Trini Phrases: Cocoa In De Sun

Cocoa in de sun along with the various words and phrases from Trinidad & Tobago can be traced back to English, French and Spanish origins. Mother-giver is one such word that has its roots in the English language. Growing up in Trinidad and Tobago is interesting because the slangs can change over time. I have lived in the United States for 20 years now, and every time I travel back to Trinidad and Tobago, I have to reacquaint myself with the words and phrases that have evolved.

Oral Traditions

Trini folklore such as Papa Bois is an oral tradition meant to pass on the stories to the next generation. Other Trini phrases in the vernacular are Santimanitay, Obzocky, Mama De-Leau,

Click here now for other Trini expressions and leave us a comment below of phrases you have heard.

Source:
Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer
Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage by Richard Allsopp

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African American Museum Washington DC

National African American Musuem

On a sultry Washington, D.C. summer day we are waiting in queue for the individual ticket allotment to the African American history museum.  The uncomfortable heat is a small cost to pay for the opportunity to see the antiquities of our ancestors.

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Tringlish: Trini Words & Phrases Dictionary

Tringlish – Trini Slang:  The local vernacular, considered as a variety of dialect of English or as an English-related creole language. This Trinidad Dictionary of slang words and phrases is the largest of its kind online and growing. A hybrid of languages from all corners of the globe but with a definitive French influence.