Brown rubber shoes

Trini Talk Today: Washikong

  • Washikong, wachekong, washeekong, watchekong, watchi-kong (n):  Rubber-soled canvas shoes; sneakers; plimsolls; running shoes. Origin unknown but two widely held theories: <French caoutchouc ‘rubber’, and Chinese perhaps Mandarin, kong hua xie ‘flower sandal’>
    • She haven’t really nothing really to eat, Only knocking bout in washikong bout the street.

Want to learn another Trini slang?  Then click Trini for an alphabetical listing of all the slangs.


Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

Featured Image  by Arwan Sutanto on Unsplash

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Medieval Soldier in armour with sword and shield

Word of the Week: Bad-John

The word of the week is a compilation of  Trinidadian sayings -phrases and words- used on the island.

Rubber Duckies on a shelf

Lime Lingo: Half-Pick Duck

  • Half-Pick Duck, Harpic Duck (phr):  Not the whole story, explanation. (French taking only half the feathers off a duck.) = duck story.
    • “Ah, dat is more like it. When yuh ah gimme ah drink, gimme ah man’s drink, no damm half pick duck” (Rollock 1975:18)

Want to learn another Trini slang?  Click Trini for an alphabetical listing of all the slangs.


Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

Featured Image by JOSHUA COLEMAN on Unsplash

Wall Murial painting.

Trini Talk Today: Obzocky

  • Obzocky, obsockie, obzokee, obsukky, obzoky, obzockie, upzuckie  (adj):  Unbalanced; awkward-looking; of ungraceful line or shape; of a batsman, not flowing or smooth. (Possibly Kikonngo  zakazaka ‘shaking’).
    • “Allyu only eatin’ ah set ah junk food like dem social bakes dey does call Pizza, an’ allyu still want to find out why allyu gettin’ fat an’ obsozky.” (Keens-Douglas 1984:87)

Want to learn another Trini slang?  Then click Trini for an alphabetical listing of all the slangs.


Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

Featured Image  by Cris DiNoto on Unsplash

Episode 3: Dingolay

  • Dingolay (v): Twists; turn; gyrate /dingole/. (Kongo dyengula ‘agitate the waist in dancing’and possibly <French dégringoler ‘tumble; fall down’).  Display yourself in a boastful or pompous manner. Dance with fancy elaborate movements.
    • De sweet music make everybody want to dingolay (Baptiste 1992)
    • The Mighty Shadow passed away October 23rd, 2018.

 

Born Oct. 4, 1941, in Trinidad, the larger island in the republic of Trinidad and Tobago, Shadow was raised by his grandparents on a farm in Les Coteaux, Tobago, where his earliest musical influences were the rhythms played on goat skin drums that were often accompanied by fiddle players, which he heard at local celebrations. Shadow started writing and singing calypsos at eight years old and by age 15 he was playing guitar and honing his craft “in front of the guys hanging on the corner.” At 16 he moved to Port of Spain, the birthplace of calypso, soca and the steel pan, just three of the vibrant genres the cosmopolitan city has given to the world. There Shadow auditioned for various calypso tents, enduring homelessness at various times in his early pursuit of music, as disclosed in the 2017 documentary, King From Hell, also the title of Shadow’s debut album.

Source: Billboard

 

Want to learn another Trini slang?  Then click Trini for an alphabetical listing of all the slangs.


Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer