Indian Children Waving

Word of the Week: Waving Gallaery

  • Waving Gallery (n):  An area of the former airport building at Piarco Trinidad, where people waiting for arriving passengers could see and wave to them as they came in. 
    • We stand up in the waving gallery and watch you pulling your bag, I could imagine how your hand feeling. (Doh Say Dat, TG, 15 Sept 1991:13)
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Brown cat laying on back on a deck.

Word of the Week: Sprawl Off

  • Sprawl Off (v):  Sprawl; lie around in a relaxed manner with limbs spread out. (< English sprawl  ‘stretch out on the ground, etc. in an awkward manner’)  = loll off, spread off.
    • After Sunday lunch, rel‘ man does be sprawl off in a hammock under the coconut tree.
Confusing Stairs

Word of the Week: Vy-kee-vy

  • Vai-ki-vai, vaillequevaille, vai-qui-vai, vie-que-vie, vike-e-vike,vi-ke-vi, vikeyvy, vy-kee-vy, vy-ki-vy (adj):  Lackadaisical; disorderly; unplanned;chaotic; irresponsible; without care or thought. French Creole vai ki vai; French vaille que vaille ‘for better or worse’ 
    • I am a true-true Trini, I do things vy-ki-vy.  I don’t need to answer questions, Like who, when, what, where, why? I live the carefree now-for-now, Worship the nine-day- wonder, I have no future plans or hopes, No scruples to live under. (Wilkes 1994)
Black Pregnant Women Standing in a field

Word of the Week: Carnival Baby

  • Carnival Baby (n):  A child born about nine months after Carnival usually in November. (From being conceived during Carnival fever.)
    • The acceptance of normally disapproved social practices such as the public consumption of alcohol and forms of sexual interaction also relate to this phenomenon, as gang warfare, no less than male/female relationships and the Carnival-baby syndrome, contribute to a societal detumescence even if for certain portions of the society more than others.
Trinidad and Tobago flag

Word of the Week: Tringlish

  • Tringlish (n):  A humorous name for the local vernacular, considered as a variety or dialect of English, or as an English-related creole language.
    • Yuh see, we in dis country does talk a t’ing we call “Tringlish” – Is a kinda secon‘ language to true, true English and to beside we does talk it fas’, fas’ and put een plenty ah we own local words like: obzokee, mamaguy, mehrazmee, tootoolbay, tobiaxee an’ t’ing. (Elcock 1997)