• Get On:  Carry on loudly; talk in an angry or excited way.
    • Any time you get ah real American in an aggravating situation, the first thing he do is let his voice be heard in objection; in other words, he does get on. (Lovelace, 1987:20)

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Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

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  • Matta Fix: Settled; arranged; ready to go.
    • A good brulejol must never boil, Once it’s well mixed, is matta fixed.
  • Brulejol:  A dish made from salt cod, oil, onions, tomatoes, peppers usually eaten for breakfast.  French origin brÛle ‘burn’ + geule ‘throat’.

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Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

  • Back a jackass in ah horse race (phrase) – Back or bet on a loser one that should have been obvious had no chance to succeed.

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Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

When yuh have cocoa in de sun, look out for rain!

Trinidadian phrase used as a warning that something is vulnerable, and needs to be protected; often used for situations in which people have something to hide.

Trini Phrases: Cocoa In De Sun

Cocoa in de sun along with the various words and phrases from Trinidad & Tobago can be traced back to English, French and Spanish origins. Mother-giver is one such word that has its roots in the English language. Growing up in Trinidad and Tobago is interesting because the slangs can change over time. I have lived in the United States for 20 years now, and every time I travel back to Trinidad and Tobago, I have to reacquaint myself with the words and phrases that have evolved.

Oral Traditions

Trini folklore such as Papa Bois is an oral tradition meant to pass on the stories to the next generation. Other Trini phrases in the vernacular are Santimanitay, Obzocky, Mama De-Leau,

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Source:
Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer
Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage by Richard Allsopp