Brown cat laying on back on a deck.

Word of the Week: Sprawl Off

  • Sprawl Off (v):  Sprawl; lie around in a relaxed manner with limbs spread out. (< English sprawl  ‘stretch out on the ground, etc. in an awkward manner’)  = loll off, spread off.
    • After Sunday lunch, rel‘ man does be sprawl off in a hammock under the coconut tree.
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Confusing Stairs

Word of the Week: Vy-kee-vy

  • Vai-ki-vai, vaillequevaille, vai-qui-vai, vie-que-vie, vike-e-vike,vi-ke-vi, vikeyvy, vy-kee-vy, vy-ki-vy (adj):  Lackadaisical; disorderly; unplanned;chaotic; irresponsible; without care or thought. French Creole vai ki vai; French vaille que vaille ‘for better or worse’ 
    • I am a true-true Trini, I do things vy-ki-vy.  I don’t need to answer questions, Like who, when, what, where, why? I live the carefree now-for-now, Worship the nine-day- wonder, I have no future plans or hopes, No scruples to live under. (Wilkes 1994)
Trinidad and Tobago flag

Word of the Week: Tringlish

  • Tringlish (n):  A humorous name for the local vernacular, considered as a variety or dialect of English, or as an English-related creole language.
    • Yuh see, we in dis country does talk a t’ing we call “Tringlish” – Is a kinda secon‘ language to true, true English and to beside we does talk it fas’, fas’ and put een plenty ah we own local words like: obzokee, mamaguy, mehrazmee, tootoolbay, tobiaxee an’ t’ing. (Elcock 1997)
Two girls gossiping

Word of the Week: Koté-si Koté-la

  • Koté-si Koté-la, coté-ci coté-la (phr): Gossip usually of the amusing kind or [used as an adjunct] And so on and so forth; etcetera.
    • Look I ain[‘t] wan[t] to be in dis coté-ci coté-la, yo[u] see! All dis dem sa[y] he sa[y] ain'[t] fo[r] me.

Click here now for other Trini expressions and leave us a comment below of phrases you have heard.


Source: Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage by Richard Allsopp.

Featured Image by AbstractDoctrine on DeviantArt

Word of the Week: Doux-Doux

  • Doudou, doodoo, doux-doux (n): Sweetness; sweetie; a term of affectionate endearment, usually used to females. (French doux ‘sweet’; such repetition is common in French Creole, but some reduplicated forms of doux, including as a term of affection, are historically found in the east and north-east of France, Aud-Buscher 1989:13; also possibly Yoruba dun ‘is sweet’ = dood(s).
    • “Ah…done tell mih wifey wot to do when I die.  Ah tell she, ‘Doo-Doo gyul, when I die, please bury min wit’ a bottle in each hand” (Sweetbread, Express 21 July  1982:42).

 

Click here now for other Trini expressions and leave us a comment below of phrases you have heard.


Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

Featured Image by Isaac Benhesed on Unsplash

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