Indian Children Waving

Word of the Week: Waving Gallaery

  • Waving Gallery (n):  An area of the former airport building at Piarco Trinidad, where people waiting for arriving passengers could see and wave to them as they came in. 
    • We stand up in the waving gallery and watch you pulling your bag, I could imagine how your hand feeling. (Doh Say Dat, TG, 15 Sept 1991:13)
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Brown cat laying on back on a deck.

Word of the Week: Sprawl Off

  • Sprawl Off (v):  Sprawl; lie around in a relaxed manner with limbs spread out. (< English sprawl  ‘stretch out on the ground, etc. in an awkward manner’)  = loll off, spread off.
    • After Sunday lunch, rel‘ man does be sprawl off in a hammock under the coconut tree.
Appetizers on a plate.

Work of the Week: Jhorts.

  • Jorts, jhorts, draughts  (n):  Food, especially snacks or refreshments.
    • If you see, endless jorts.
    • Right in front of his place, he has the big lawn tennis court where prospective clients or investors could talk it over…cuffing down their liquor and small jorts.

Click here now for other Trini expressions and leave us a comment below of phrases you have heard.


Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

Featured Image by Kelly Jean on Unsplash

Word of the Week: Parang

  • Parang (n) :  A traditional Venezuelan-derived type of singing, sometimes improvisational, on religious themes, usually entirely in Spanish, performed around Christmas, in house-to-house carolling or while visiting friends. (Spanish parranda ‘serenading; going out and singing; having a good time’)
    • I myself buy rum for when the neighbours come over, and when the parang pass playing the quatros and signing the seranales for Christmas.

Word of the Week: Doux-Doux

  • Doudou, doodoo, doux-doux (n): Sweetness; sweetie; a term of affectionate endearment, usually used to females. (French doux ‘sweet’; such repetition is common in French Creole, but some reduplicated forms of doux, including as a term of affection, are historically found in the east and north-east of France, Aud-Buscher 1989:13; also possibly Yoruba dun ‘is sweet’ = dood(s).
    • “Ah…done tell mih wifey wot to do when I die.  Ah tell she, ‘Doo-Doo gyul, when I die, please bury min wit’ a bottle in each hand” (Sweetbread, Express 21 July  1982:42).

 

Click here now for other Trini expressions and leave us a comment below of phrases you have heard.


Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

Featured Image by Isaac Benhesed on Unsplash

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