• Kuyoh (n):  Fool; someone easily deceived; under someone’s power. /kuyo/ Spanish cuna or French couillon ‘fool; imbecile’.
    • His wife horning him, she have him so kuyoh, he only washing wares.
  • Horn (v):  Cuckold; commit adultery; have a sexual relationship outside of an official one.
    • Platform work demands at least the minding of one deputy, in case your wife is horning you while you’re out there, drilling.

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Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

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  • Catty-Catty (adj):  Said of a man who likes sex with many women.
    • She lend one brush to Lord Shorty, the catty catty one from South.

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Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

  • Pail Closet: An outside latrine; an enclosed toilet consisting of a pail (bucket) underneath a seat with an opening in it.

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Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

  • Chiffonay (verb): Of a kite or a woman’s walk, moving gracefully from side to side (French chiffoner ‘crumple; crease’).
    • The kite flyer could make the kite “chiffonere” by firmly holding the thread in one hand making rapid but gentle tugs that made the kite and it cloth tail move gracefully from side to side in opposite directions to each other. “Chiffonere” was attributed to women who purposely swayed their bodies as they walked.

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Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

  • Dotish: Stupid; slow-thinking;incompetent.
    • Dotish men like you deserve what you get.  If you can’t work things out with your own woman, then stop complaining.  Sorf -soft- men like you should simply do as you are told.

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Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer