Santimanitay - Jesus On A Cross

Trini Phrase of the Week: Santimanitay

  • Sandimanitay, sans humanité, sandemanetay, santimanitay (n): A traditional Kalinda and Calypso challenge refrain. (French sans humanité ‘without mercy’).
    • None of the bands sang any properly composed songs, most of t the songs having a jingle of words uttered with lightning-like rapidity and ending with the monotonous sans humanité.
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Trinidad Mermaid

Trini Folklore: Mermaids

There be mermaid here and Leviathan, great residents of the underwater. Amongst the writhing tides and white-capped blue-green waters, just where the Caribbean Sea reaches the Atlantic Ocean.

  • Mermaid (n) Tobago: The mermaid or fairy maid is a folklore character of a woman with a fish tail instead of legs, who lives in a river or in the sea near the coast. She is not dangerous or evil but can pull people under the water, take them travelling, and then return them to shore.
    • It used to have a mermaid in the river here, but nobody ent see she for donkey years now.
Phantom in the forest

Trini Folklore: Phantom

  • Phantom (n) A folklore character; a very tall, misty white figure who stands at crossroads, and traps those who pass between his legs.
    • Then there were phantom – the headless spectre with extremely long legs that grip his victims in a death squeeze (Ahye 1983:45).
    • Even our mighty phantoms have found themselves confused with the old mas character from the comic strips (Araujo 1984:43).
Quelbe African Lady Dancing

Word of the Week: Quelbe

  • Quelbe, quelba, quilbay 1 (n): A kind of African dance possibly of Congo origin, comprising songs, drumming and dances performed by women.
    • As late as 1940 on the hills in Charlotteville at nights one could hear the music of Congo women playing what villagers called Congo-drum (marli doun-doun) and tambour-bamboo…and dancing quelbe reputed to be a very wild erocitc dance for females only.
Bobol

Word of the Week: Bobol

  • Bobol, bubol, boboll, bubbbul (n): Graft; corruption; fraud; embezzlement. (Origin: South Central Zoombo Kikongo lu-bubulucorruption’; Kikongo bubulabecome corrupt; go rancid’). Kikongo either of two similar Bantu languages spoken in Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo (Zaire), and adjacent areas.
    • I wonder if it’s bobol, What they doing with taxpayers’ money at all. (Atilla “Treasury Scandal” 1937)
    • Yeh, ah hear e have ah big house wit’ swimmin’ pool an’ e have 4 big cars…” “So wot business he in?” “Bobol!” (Sweetbread, Express 1 October 1980:23)