Word of the Week: Parang

  • Parang (n) :  A traditional Venezuelan-derived type of singing, sometimes improvisational, on religious themes, usually entirely in Spanish, performed around Christmas, in house-to-house carolling or while visiting friends. (Spanish parranda ‘serenading; going out and singing; having a good time’)
    • I myself buy rum for when the neighbours come over, and when the parang pass playing the quatros and signing the seranales for Christmas.
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Two girls gossiping

Word of the Week: Koté-si Koté-la

  • Koté-si Koté-la, coté-ci coté-la (phr): Gossip usually of the amusing kind or [used as an adjunct] And so on and so forth; etcetera.
    • Look I ain[‘t] wan[t] to be in dis coté-ci coté-la, yo[u] see! All dis dem sa[y] he sa[y] ain'[t] fo[r] me.

Click here now for other Trini expressions and leave us a comment below of phrases you have heard.


Source: Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage by Richard Allsopp.

Featured Image by AbstractDoctrine on DeviantArt

Books by my Bed

Books by my bed are not analogous to the New York Times Best Seller List but I wanted to share the books I am reading and provide some insight into why they have been chosen.

Word of the Week: Doux-Doux

  • Doudou, doodoo, doux-doux (n): Sweetness; sweetie; a term of affectionate endearment, usually used to females. (French doux ‘sweet’; such repetition is common in French Creole, but some reduplicated forms of doux, including as a term of affection, are historically found in the east and north-east of France, Aud-Buscher 1989:13; also possibly Yoruba dun ‘is sweet’ = dood(s).
    • “Ah…done tell mih wifey wot to do when I die.  Ah tell she, ‘Doo-Doo gyul, when I die, please bury min wit’ a bottle in each hand” (Sweetbread, Express 21 July  1982:42).

 

Click here now for other Trini expressions and leave us a comment below of phrases you have heard.


Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

Featured Image by Isaac Benhesed on Unsplash

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