Buck in the bushes.

Trini Folklore: Buck

Buck (n) an aboriginal Indian native of Guyana. A Guyana Amerindian locally generally refers to the Guarahoon tribe, living in Venezuela, and sometimes Guyana. (English buck ‘a man, applied to native Indians of South America’ probably Dutch bok ‘he-goat’) Warahoon.

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Rachifee: Man sweeping the word truth with a broom under a red rug

Word of the Week: Rachifee

  • Rachifee, ratcheefi, ratchifi, rachify (n): Somethings done in a makeshift, careless, or slightly devious way; or as a result of cheating, corruptions, or trickery. (Possibly French rafistolĂ© ‘mended; patched up; English retrofit ‘force something to fit; use something not originally designed for the task’
    • The amount of ‘bobboll‘ and rachifee going one with we money in that project.
    • Excuse me, but when you speak of ‘culture’ in our society, you mean culture as including rachifee ?” (Alleyne -Forte 1994:99
Carnival Tabanca

Word of the Week: Tabanca

Tabanca, tabanka, tabankca, tobanca (n) (Grenada, Guyana, Trinidad): A painful feeling of unrequited love, from loving someone who does not love in return, especially someone who was once a lover or spouse. (No reliable derivation has been found for this word, though some possibilities have been proposed, e.g. (Kikongo tabaka ‘sell out or buy up completely’).

Trinidad Pelau

Trinidad Pelau Recipe

In every culture around the world, there is a favourite one-pot dish: Indian Biryani, Vietnamese Pho, Guyanese Pepper Pot and Pelau from Trinidad. Pelau is de one-pot dish at the heart of every Trini lime.

Trinidad Blue Devi for Jouvert

Word of the Week: Jouvert

  • Jouvert, Jour ouvert, Jouvert (n): [Trinidad Jouvert] the official beginning of Carnival at daybreak on the Monday preceding Ash Wednesday. (< French Creole jou ouve <French jour ouvert ‘day open’, as a translation of day clean)
    • Well for me I waiting on Jour Ouvert, Just to jump me jum[p] and break away. (Kitchener “Jump in the Line” 1948)
    • The Jour Ouvert of 1920 Port-of-Spain saw revellers crowding the streets from the crack of dawn, and in the bands, amidst the beaters of tamboo-bamboo, and bottle-and-spoon, could be seen revellers depicting crooks, pick-pockets, burglars, beggers, highway robbers, and Barbadian cooks. (Anthony 1989:25)
    • Jouvay…the opening day of Carnival which begins in the early morning hours (often officially 2:00 A.M.) Monday morning before Ash Wednesday. Jouvay is a nocturnal mas that breaks shortly after dawn. Thousands of revellers in old clothes covered with mud, or as Blue or Red Devils, or drenched in black oil (Oil Men) fill the streets. (Martin 1998:227)