Two women kissing and taking a selfie.

Can you do Trinidad Carnival on a budget?

I was recently olë talking with two 🐎 of mine about Carnival. I eh go call no names, because ah recently travelled with them to 🇯🇲 and I eh want to blowup dey spot.

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Word of the Week: Tringlish

  • Tringlish (n):  A humorous name for the local vernacular, considered as a variety or dialect of English, or as an English-related creole language.
    • Yuh see, we in dis country does talk a t’ing we call “Tringlish” – Is a kinda secon‘ language to true, true English and to beside we does talk it fas’, fas’ and put een plenty ah we own local words like: obzokee, mamaguy, mehrazmee, tootoolbay, tobiaxee an’ t’ing. (Elcock 1997)
Finished rustic bread on a cooling rack.

Bread Making 101

Bread making has been a craft that I’ve wanting to learn for various years and have acquired copious books to teach myself the craft. The initial book I acquired was Bread Illustrated: A Step-By-Step Guide to Achieving Bakery-Quality Results At Home was a great first start with some basic recipes for the postulant baker. Directions from this book were straightforward to comprehend and also contained troubleshooting tips in the event your bread didn’t turn out as intended.

Appetizers on a plate.

Work of the Week: Jhorts.

  • Jorts, jhorts, draughts  (n):  Food, especially snacks or refreshments.
    • If you see, endless jorts.
    • Right in front of his place, he has the big lawn tennis court where prospective clients or investors could talk it over…cuffing down their liquor and small jorts.

Click here now for other Trini expressions and leave us a comment below of phrases you have heard.


Source: Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago by Lise Winer

Featured Image by Kelly Jean on Unsplash

Word of the Week: Parang

  • Parang (n) :  A traditional Venezuelan-derived type of singing, sometimes improvisational, on religious themes, usually entirely in Spanish, performed around Christmas, in house-to-house carolling or while visiting friends. (Spanish parranda ‘serenading; going out and singing; having a good time’)
    • I myself buy rum for when the neighbours come over, and when the parang pass playing the quatros and signing the seranales for Christmas.