Trinidad Pelau

Trinidad Pelau Recipe

In every culture around the world, there is a favourite one-pot dish: Indian Biryani, Vietnamese Pho, Guyanese Pepper Pot and Pelau. Trinidad Pelau is de one-pot dish at the heart of every Trini lime. See below a Trinidad pelau recipe is a jhorts your kids will love.

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Trinidad Blue Devi for Jouvert

Word of the Week: Jouvert

  • Jouvert, Jour ouvert, Jouvert (n): [Trinidad Jouvert] the official beginning of Carnival at daybreak on the Monday preceding Ash Wednesday. (< French Creole jou ouve <French jour ouvert ‘day open’, as a translation of day clean)
    • Well for me I waiting on Jour Ouvert, Just to jump me jum[p] and break away. (Kitchener “Jump in the Line” 1948)
    • The Jour Ouvert of 1920 Port-of-Spain saw revellers crowding the streets from the crack of dawn, and in the bands, amidst the beaters of tamboo-bamboo, and bottle-and-spoon, could be seen revellers depicting crooks, pick-pockets, burglars, beggers, highway robbers, and Barbadian cooks. (Anthony 1989:25)
    • Jouvay…the opening day of Carnival which begins in the early morning hours (often officially 2:00 A.M.) Monday morning before Ash Wednesday. Jouvay is a nocturnal mas that breaks shortly after dawn. Thousands of revellers in old clothes covered with mud, or as Blue or Red Devils, or drenched in black oil (Oil Men) fill the streets. (Martin 1998:227)
Lord Kitchener Flag Women in a Word Cloud.

Trinidad Carnival a mi·sog·y·nist culture?

I am a 🇹🇹 by birth, but I currently live in Maryland, 🇺🇸. I still, however, acknowledge Trinidad and Tobago and its culture as home and the space in which I feel most comfy. One of Trinidad’s most renowned commodities is Trinidad Carnival and thousands congregate on the island every year for the annual festivities.

Orisha Diety

Word of the Week: Orisha

  • Orisha (n): An African religion, mostly of Yoruba origin, known also as SHANGO, based on the worship of numerous ORISHA (deities), who also have Catholic counterparts. Worship includes spirit possession, drumming, dancing, chanting, and animal sacrifice. Severely represses at times during the past, it has survived, and is now more openly accepted (Yoruba orisha ‘diety’) = African work, Shango.
    • Devotees of the Orisha or the Rada faiths were often imprisoned and even flogged under an 1868 law –Convictions Ordinance 1868 – which made the practice of ‘Obeah’ a criminal offence. (Brereton 1993:50)
    • Steelbands as well was tamboo bamboo bands had a deep connection, in terms of musical influence with Orisha centres in East Dry River (Stuempfle 1995:39)
Doll face with evil eyes

Word of the Week: Maljo

  • Maljo, maljoe, maljeu (n):  Evil eye; the belief that a conscious or unconscious look of envy or ill will can harm someone.  <French Creole malzie, Spanish  mal de ojo ‘evil eye’; Yoruba fi oju buruku si ‘put ugly eye on, Igbo /ole anja ‘look ugly  eye’, Kikongo /ntadidi je disu/ ‘look with bad eye’
    • I heard them say how my donkey grows, It seems like they want to give it maljo… The whole this is through jealousy , Because they want to buy me donkey from me.
    • A disease, attributed to maljo, characterized by fever, changed colour, inability to urinate, loss of appetite and weight, greenish stool.